WEG MediaWiki

M270 American Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS)

tiers
false
false
true
false
categories
"WEG"
"Artillery"
"Rocket Artillery Systems"
"Medium Rocket Systems (Up to 100 km)"
"United States"
"PRO_Bahrain"
"PRO_Egypt"
"PRO_Finland"
"PRO_France"
"PRO_Germany"
"PRO_Greece"
"PRO_Israel"
"PRO_Italy"
"PRO_Japan"
"PRO_Saudi Arabia"
"PRO_Turkey"
"PRO_United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland"
"PRO_United States of America"
"Land"
"Tier3"
notes"The M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System (M270 MLRS) is an armored, self-propelled, multiple rocket launcher (a type of rocket artillery). Since the first M270s were delivered to the U.S. Army in 1983, the MLRS has been adopted by several NATO countries. Some 1,300 M270 systems have been manufactured in the United States and in Europe, along with more than 700,000 rockets. The production of the M270 ended in 2003, when a last batch was delivered to the Egyptian Army. MLRS was developed jointly by the United Kingdom, United States, West Germany, France and Italy, developed from the older General Support Rocket System (GSRS). The M270 MLRS weapons system is collectively known as the M270 MLRS Self-Propelled Loader/Launcher (SPLL). The SPLL is composed of three primary subsystems: the M269 Loader Launcher Module (LLM), which also houses the electronic Fire Control System, is mated to the M993 Carrier Vehicle. The M993 is a derivative of the Bradley Fighting Vehicle chassis. Cold War doctrine for the M270 was for the vehicles to spread out individually and hide until needed, then move to a firing position and launch their rockets, immediately move away to a reloading point, then move to a completely new hiding position near a different firing point. These shoot-and-scoot tactics were planned to avoid susceptibility to Soviet counterbattery fire. One M270 firing 12 M26 rockets would drop 7,728 bomblets, and one MLRS battery firing 108 rockets had the equivalent firepower of 33 battalions of cannon artillery. The system can fire rockets or MGM-140 ATACMS missiles, which are contained in interchangeable pods. Each pod contains six standard rockets or one guided ATACMS missile; the two types cannot be mixed. The LLM can hold two pods at a time, which are hand-loaded using an integrated winch system. All twelve rockets or two ATACMS missiles can be fired in under a minute. One launcher firing twelve rockets can completely blanket one square kilometer with submunitions. For this reason, the MLRS is sometimes referred to as the "Grid Square Removal System" (metric maps are usually divided up into 1 km grids). Or informally among artillery personnel as "the finger of God", since a single launcher can sanitize an entire grid square, which is about the size of a fingertip on a typical map. A typical MLRS cluster salvo consisted of three M270 vehicles each firing all 12 rockets. With each rocket containing 644 M77 grenades, the entire salvo would drop 23,184 grenades in the target area. However, with a two percent dud rate, that would leave approximately 400 undetonated bombs scattered over the area, which could endanger friendly troops and civilians. In 2006, MLRS was upgraded to fire guided rounds. Phase I testing of a guided unitary round (XM31) was completed on an accelerated schedule in March 2006. Due to an Urgent Need Statement, the guided unitary round was quickly fielded and used in action in Iraq. Lockheed Martin also received a contract to convert existing M30 Dual-Purpose Improved Conventional Munition (DPICM) GMLRS rockets to the XM31 unitary variant. The M31 GMLRS Unitary rocket transformed the M270 into a point target artillery system for the first time. Due to GPS guidance and a single 200 lb (91 kg) high-explosive warhead, the M31 could hit targets accurately with less chance of collateral damage while needing fewer rockets to be fired, reducing logistical requirements. The unitary warhead also made the MLRS able to be used in urban environments. The M31 had a dual-mode fuse with point detonation and delay options to defeat soft targets and lightly fortified bunkers respectively, with the upgraded M31A1 equipped with a multi-mode fuse adding a proximity airburst mode for use against personnel in the open; proximity mode can be set for 3 or 10 meters (9.8 or 32.8 ft) Height Of Burst (HOB). The GMLRS has a minimum engagement range of 15 km (9.3 mi) and can hit a target out to 70 km (43 mi), impacting at a speed of Mach 2.5. A German developmental artillery system, called the Artillery Gun Module, has used the MLRS chassis on its developmental vehicles. In 2012, a contract was issued to improve the armor of the M270s and improve the fire control to the standards of the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS). In June 2015, the M270A1 conducted tests of firing rockets after upgrades from the Improved Armored Cab project, which provides the vehicle with an enhanced armored cab and windows."
dateOfIntroduction1983
countryOfOrigin"United States"
proliferation"Bahrain, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Italy, Japan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America"
selectedregions
"All Regions"
checkedregions
Empty array
checkedcountries
"Bahrain"
"Egypt"
"Finland"
"France"
"Germany"
"Greece"
"Israel"
"Italy"
"Japan"
"Saudi Arabia"
"Turkey"
"United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland"
"United States of America"
dis
name"MRL M270 TRKD"
string"01.01.225.004.001.000.000"
images
"M270_Multiple_Launch_Rocket_System(E).jpg"
"M270_Multiple_Launch_Rocket_System(D).jpg"
"M270_Multiple_Launch_Rocket_System(B).jpg"
sections
name"System"
properties
name"Alternative Designation"
value"M270"
name"Type"
value"Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS)"
name"Composite"
value"The M270 multiple launch rocket system (MLRS), also known as the armored vehicle-mounted rocket launcher (AVMRL), consists of an M269 launcher loader module (LLM) bearing two six-cell rocket launch pods/containers (LP/C) mounted on an M993 carrier vehicle."
name"Crew"
value"3 (section chief, gunner and driver) crew can fire entire load from cab and can reload MLRS without other help."
name"Chassis"
value"M993 carrier vehicle. The M993 is a modified M2 Bradley armored personnel carrier."
name"Displacement Time"
value"Less than 5 min"
name"Emplacement Time"
value"Less than 5 min"
name"Dimensions"
properties
name"Length"
value"6.97 m"
name"Width"
value"2.97 m"
name"Height, Elevated"
value"5.93 m"
name"Height, Traveling"
value"2.62 m"
name"Track Length on Ground"
value"4.33 m"
name"Track Width"
value"0.53 m"
name"Ground Clearance"
value"0.43 m"
name"Combat Weight"
value"25,191 kg"
name"Unloaded Weight"
value"20,189 kg"
name"Launch Pad Weight"
value"2,270 kg"
name"Automotive"
properties
name"Engine Name"
value"1 x Cummins VTA-903"
name"Engine Type"
value"903-cu in (14.8-liter) liquid-cooled, 4-stroke, turbo-charged, V-8 diesel"
name"Engine Power"
value"500 hp at 2400 rpm"
name"Power-to-Weight Ratio"
value"19.85 hp/metric ton"
name"Fuel Capacity"
value"617 liters"
name"Transmission"
value"General Electric HMPT-500 hydro-mechanical; 3 forward/1 reverse range (variable ratios)"
name"Suspension"
value"torsion bar, 6 dual road wheels, front drive, rear idler, 2 shock absorbers, 4 return rollers"
name"Maximum Speed"
value"64 km/h"
name"Maximum Range"
value"483 km"
name"Gradient"
value"60 percent"
name"Vertical Obstacle"
value"1.00 m"
name"Trench"
value"2.29 m"
name"Fording"
value"1.10 m"
name"Main Weapon System"
sections
name"System"
properties
name"Name"
value"M269 launcher loader module (LLM)"
name"Type"
value"Launcher Loader Module"
name"Caliber"
value"227 mm"
name"Number of Cells"
value"12"
units"ea"
name"Elevation"
value"60 deg (1,067 mils)"
name"Elevation Rate"
value"0.9 deg (15.5 mils)/sec"
name"Traverse"
value"+/-194 deg (3,449 mils) each side of centerline"
name"Rate of Fire"
value"less than one minute for 12 missiles"
name"Effective Firing Range"
value"See Ammunition Types"
name"Reload Time"
value"4 min (M270) 3 min (M270A1)"
name"Ammunition (Option 1)"
properties
name"Name"
value"M26 (Phase I)"
name"Length"
value"3.94 m"
name"Diameter"
value"227 mm"
name"Weight"
value"306 kg"
name"Warhead"
value"156 kg"
name"Maximum Range"
value"32 km"
name"Basic Load"
value"INA"
name"Ammunition (Option 2)"
properties
name"Name"
value"AT2 (Phase II)"
name"Length"
value"3.94 m"
name"Diameter"
value"227 mm"
name"Weight"
value"259 kg"
name"Warhead"
value"107 kg"
name"Maximum Range"
value"40 km"
name"Basic Load"
value"INA"
name"Ammunition (Option 3)"
properties
name"Name"
value"GMLRS"
name"Length"
value"3.94 m"
name"Diameter"
value"227 mm"
name"Weight"
value"302 kg"
name"Maximum Range"
value"60 km"
name"Basic Load"
value"INA"
name"Fire Control"
properties
name"Name"
value"Westinghouse Norden FCS"
name"Computerized FCS"
value"Yes"
name"Direct Fire"
value"Yes"
name"Indirect Fire"
value"Yes"
name"SRP/PDS"
value"Bendix stabilization reference package/position determining system (SRP/PDS)"
name"Protection"
properties
name"Hull Armor"
value"The cab is protected against small-arms fire and shell fragments by aluminum armor and louvred windows. Some U.S. M270s are equipped with a Mk 19 40-mm automatic grenade launcher on the roof."
name"Applique Armor"
value"No"
name"Explosive Reactive Armor"
value"No"
name"Active Protection System"
value"No"
name"NBC Protection"
value"overpressure protection"
name"Smoke Equipment"
value"INA"
name"EMP"
value"Hardened electronics"
variants
name"M270"
notes"is the original version, which carries a weapon load of 12 rockets in two six-pack launch pod containers. This armored, tracked mobile launcher uses a stretched Bradley chassis and has a high cross-country capability."
name"M270 IPDS"
notes"was an interim upgrade applied to a select number of launchers to provide the ability to fire the longer-range GPS-aided ATACMS Block IA, quick-reaction unitary and Block II missiles until sufficient M270A1 launchers were fielded."
name"M270A1"
notes"was the result of a 2005 upgrade program for the U.S. Army, and later on for several other states. The launcher appears identical to M270, but incorporates an improved fire control system (IFCS) and an improved launcher mechanical system (ILMS). This allows for significantly faster launch procedures and the firing of new types of munitions, including GPS guided missiles."
name"M270B1"
notes"is a British Army upgrade, similar to the A1, but it also includes an enhanced armor package, which gives the crew better protection against IED attacks."
name"M270C1"
notes"was an upgrade proposal from Lockheed Martin involving HIMARS Universal Fire Control System (UFCS) instead of IFCS"
name"MARS2 / LRU"
notes"is a European upgrade of M270 involving Germany, Italy and France. MARS2 is equipped with a new fire control system (EFCS - European Fire Control System) designed par Airbus Defense and Space. EFCS enables firing of M31, M31A1, M32, AT2 and 110 mm rockets, but not of M26, M26A1, and M30, so as to ensure full compliance with the Convention on Cluster Munitions."
name"M270D1"
notes"includes a new fire control system that allows for firing GPS-guided rockets, such as GMLRS and ATACMS. The update package consists of a new computer, locating device, GPS antenna, launch control unit, displays and remote control device. Current operators include United States, United Kingdom, Bahrain, and Finland."
type"WEG"
version1
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