WEG MediaWiki

RPD Russian 7.62mm Light Machine Gun

tiers
false
false
false
true
categories
"WEG"
"Infantry Weapons"
"Machine Guns"
"Light Machine Guns (LMG)"
"Russia (RUS)"
"PRO_Afghanistan"
"PRO_Albania"
"PRO_Algeria"
"PRO_Angola"
"PRO_Azerbaijan"
"PRO_Bangladesh"
"PRO_Benin"
"PRO_Bolivia (Plurinational State of)"
"PRO_Burundi"
"PRO_Cambodia"
"PRO_Cape Verde"
"PRO_Central African Republic"
"PRO_Chad"
"PRO_Congo"
"PRO_Djibouti"
"PRO_Egypt"
"PRO_Equatorial Guinea"
"PRO_Eritrea"
"PRO_Ethiopia"
"PRO_Ghana"
"PRO_Guinea"
"PRO_Hungary"
"PRO_Indonesia"
"PRO_Iraq"
"PRO_Israel"
"PRO_Ivory Coast"
"PRO_Laos (People's Democratic Republic)"
"PRO_Lesotho"
"PRO_Libya"
"PRO_Mali"
"PRO_Malta"
"PRO_Mongolia"
"PRO_Morocco"
"PRO_Nicaragua"
"PRO_Niger"
"PRO_Nigeria"
"PRO_North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea)"
"PRO_Pakistan"
"PRO_Peru"
"PRO_Romania"
"PRO_Rwanda"
"PRO_Seychelles"
"PRO_Sierra Leone"
"PRO_Somalia"
"PRO_Sudan"
"PRO_Syria"
"PRO_Tanzania"
"PRO_Togo"
"PRO_Uganda"
"PRO_Viet Nam"
"PRO_Yemen"
"PRO_Zimbabwe"
"Land"
"Tier4"
notes"The RPD is a 7.62mm light machine gun developed in the Soviet Union by Vasily Degtyaryov for the 7.62×39mm M43 intermediate cartridge. It was created as a replacement for the DP machine gun chambered for the 7.62×54mmR round. It is a precursor of most squad automatic weapons. It was succeeded in Soviet service by the RPK. The RPD is an automatic weapon using a gas-operated long-stroke piston system and a locking system recycled from previous Degtyaryov small arms, consisting of a pair of hinged flaps set in recesses on each side of the receiver. The movement of these flaps and the resulting locking and unlocking action is controlled by carefully angled surfaces on the bolt carrier assembly. The weapon fires from an open bolt. The RPD is a hammer fired from an open bolt. The hammer forms part of the rear of the bolt carrier (which is connected to the gas piston), which continues moving forward for a short distance after the round is chambered and the bolt locked, the hammer face then striking the rear of the free-floating firing pin which passes through the length of the bolt. Locking occurs by means of lateral flaps located along the sides of the bolt, which are forced outwards (by the angled sides of the hammer) into recesses cut into the receiver body, after which firing occurs when the face of the hammer strikes the rear of the firing pin. The mechanism is simple, rugged, and reliable. It features a trigger mechanism that is limited to fully automatic fire only. The bolt is equipped with a spring-loaded casing extraction system, and a fixed insert inside the receiver housing which passes between the feed horns of the bolt serves as the ejector. Spent cartridge casings are ejected downward through an opening in the bolt carrier and receiver. The RPD has a manually operated lever-type safety mechanism that secures the weapon against accidental firing by blocking the bolt catch when engaged. Unlike Degtyarov's earlier firearm patents, the RPD's return spring is located inside the butt. Like many other Russian-made firearms, the chamber and bore are chrome-lined, greatly decreasing the risk of corrosion and jamming.[citation needed] The weapon has a non-removable barrel with a three-position gas adjustment valve used to control the performance of the gas system. It is also equipped with a folding integral bipod, wooden shoulder stock, foregrip, and pistol grip. The firearm strips down into the following major groups: the receiver and barrel, bolt, bolt carrier, feed tray, and feed cover, the recoil mechanism, and the trigger group and stock. The RPD fires from an open bolt in full auto only. There is no provision for semi-auto fire, although RPD gunners were trained to fire in short bursts to prolong the life of the non-quick-change barrels. The RPD feeds ammunition from the left side using a metallic, open-link, non-disintegrating belt typically holding 100 rounds of 7.62x39 ammunition. Unlike many other belt-fed automatic weapons, where the rounds must be pulled out the rear of the belt and then pushed forward into the chamber, the RPD uses a simpler "push through" design where the rounds are pushed out the front of the belt and into the chamber. At least three variants of the RPD belt were produced. The Russians and Hungarians both produced 50-round belt segments, while the Chinese produced 25-round belt segments. The Russian RPD belts held the rounds in place using the extractor groove. The Hungarians designed a simpler belt that held the cartridges in place using an "L"-shaped tab at the rear of the belt. The Chinese copied the Hungarian design for their belts, albeit in 25-round lengths instead of 50. RPD belt segments are connected using a round of ammunition that holds the last link of the first belt and the first link of the next belt together. When the last round in a belt segment is fired, that belt segment disconnects and falls away, reducing the chances of the empty belt snagging or becoming entangled. Regardless of the style of belt used, the RPD was typically fed using 100 rounds of linked ammunition. The Russian, Hungarian, and Chinese RPD belts are all interchangeable and can be linked together without affecting the feeding of the RPD. The combined belt segments are stored in a metal drum that is attached to a mount on the receiver, for a total of 100 rounds. The RPD can also feed belts that are not contained in a drum if, for example, there is a need for more than 100 rounds of linked ammunition at a time. The feed system is operated by a roller connected to the reciprocating bolt carrier assembly. The belt is pulled into the gun during the rearward motion of the bolt carrier. The noteworthy flaw in the drum's design is its unreliability in dirty conditions; it can become clogged with filth and other natural elements."
dateOfIntroduction1944
countryOfOrigin"Russia (RUS)"
proliferation"Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Hungary, Indonesia, Iraq, Israel, Ivory Coast, Laos (People's Democratic Republic), Lesotho, Libya, Mali, Malta, Mongolia, Morocco, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea), Pakistan, Peru, Romania, Rwanda, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Viet Nam, Yemen, Zimbabwe"
selectedregions
Empty array
checkedregions
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checkedcountries
"Afghanistan"
"Albania"
"Algeria"
"Angola"
"Azerbaijan"
"Bangladesh"
"Benin"
"Bolivia (Plurinational State of)"
"Burundi"
"Cambodia"
"Cape Verde"
"Central African Republic"
"Chad"
"Congo"
"Djibouti"
"Egypt"
"Equatorial Guinea"
"Eritrea"
"Ethiopia"
"Ghana"
"Guinea"
"Hungary"
"Indonesia"
"Iraq"
"Israel"
"Ivory Coast"
"Laos (People's Democratic Republic)"
"Lesotho"
"Libya"
"Mali"
"Malta"
"Mongolia"
"Morocco"
"Nicaragua"
"Niger"
"Nigeria"
"North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea)"
"Pakistan"
"Peru"
"Romania"
"Rwanda"
"Seychelles"
"Sierra Leone"
"Somalia"
"Sudan"
"Syria"
"Tanzania"
"Togo"
"Uganda"
"Viet Nam"
"Yemen"
"Zimbabwe"
dis
name"Unknown"
string"00.00.000.000.000.000.000"
images
"RPD_(A).png"
"RPD_(B).jpg"
"Russian 7.62mm Light Machinegun, RPD.png"
sections
name"System"
properties
name"Alternative Designation"
value"Degtyarev"
name"Operation"
value"Gas"
name"Fire Mode"
value"Automatic"
name"Mount"
value"Bipod"
name"Feed System"
value"Metallic-link belt, 100-rd drum (containing belt). The Chinese copies may use 200-rd drums."
name"Quick Change Barrel"
value"No"
name"Rate of Fire (Cyclic)"
value"600"
units"rd/min"
name"Rate of Fire (Practical)"
value"150"
units"rd/min"
name"Dimensions"
properties
name"Overall Length"
value"1,037"
units"mm"
name"Barrel Length"
value"520"
units"mm"
name"Empty Weight (w/o magazine)"
value"7"
units"kg"
name"Loaded (with magazine)"
value"13"
units"kg"
name"Ammunition"
sections
name"M1943 (57N231S)"
properties
name"Caliber/length"
value"7.62x39-mm"
name"Type"
value"Ball, steel core"
name"Effective Range"
value"800"
units"m"
name"Maximum Range"
value"800"
units"m"
name"Armor Penetration"
value"6 mm mild steel plate at 300 m Steel helmet at 1,000 m Flak vest at 60 m"
name"Muzzle Velocity"
value"718"
units"m/s"
name"M1943 (T-45 or 57N231P)"
properties
name"Caliber/length"
value"7.62x39-mm"
name"Type"
value"Ball-Tracer"
name"Effective Range"
value"800"
units"m"
name"Maximum Range"
value"800"
units"m"
name"Trace"
value"800"
units"m"
name"Muzzle Velocity"
value"718"
units"m/s"
name"M1943"
properties
name"Caliber/length"
value"7.62x39-mm"
name"Type"
value"API"
name"Armor Penetration"
value"8"
units"mm"
name"Muzzle Velocity (m/s)"
value"N/A"
name"Sights"
sections
name"Sights"
properties
name"Type"
value"Leaf sights"
name"Sight Range (m)"
value"900 in 100 meter increments."
name"Magnification"
value"None"
name"Night Sights Available"
value"Yes"
name"Note"
value"The RPD is equipped with a set of open-type iron sights. These consist of a front post and a notched rear sight mounted on a tangent. Both the front and rear sights on the RPD are adjustable for windage and elevation. The front sight is adjusted up or down for elevation using a tool included in the issued cleaning kit. To adjust the front sight for windage, the smaller of the two wrenches on the multi-tool included in the issued cleaning kit is used to loosen the retaining bolt on the front sight clamp. The front sight can then be adjusted left or right for the correct windage, after which the retaining bolt is reinstalled to lock the sight into place. The rear sight is adjusted for elevation using a slider. The rear sight is marked in 100 meter increments from 100 to 1,000 meters. The rear sight is adjusted for windage using a knob on the left side of the rear sight. Because the front sight of the RPD must be partially disassembled in order to adjust windage, in practice the front sight would have been zeroed for windage and then locked in place. Adjustment for windage in the field would have been accomplished using the knob on the rear sight. A number of RPDs were fitted with a side rail (attached to the left side of the receiver) to accept an NSP-2 night vision sight."
name"Accessories"
properties
name"Note"
value"Standard accessories issued with the weapon include and sling, extra ammunition drums and belts (with either belt or shoulder pouches for same), oil bottle, cleaning rod (carried in a slot on the left side of the receiver), (stowed in a compartment inside the stock), and drop case. The cleaning kit consists of a rectangular metal clam-shell case that typically contains the following tools and spare parts: pin punch (used for disassembling the bolt), cleaning jag, multi-tool (includes screwdriver, small and large wrenches used for adjusting the front sight and gas system, respectively, and a notch for installing and removing the cleaning jag on the cleaning rod), broken case extractor, front sight adjustment tool, gas tube scraping tool, gas port reamer, spare extractor, spare extractor spring, spare firing pin. There are a number of spring steel "fingers" on the lid of the clam-shell case which press on the contents of the cleaning kit when closed to prevent rattling. One end of the clam-shell case has a notch from which the screwdriver end of the multi-tool can protrude."
variants
name"Type 56 & 56-1"
notes"Chinese version."
name"Type 62 Light MG"
notes"North Korean version."
name"M52"
notes"Czech version."
type"WEG"
version1
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