WEG MediaWiki

Su-25 Grach (Frogfoot) Russian Close Air Support Aircraft

tiers
false
false
true
false
categories
"WEG"
"Aircraft"
"Fixed Wing Aircraft"
"Attack Aircraft"
"Russia (RUS)"
"PRO_Angola"
"PRO_Armenia"
"PRO_Azerbaijan"
"PRO_Belarus"
"PRO_Bulgaria"
"PRO_CFE Treaty"
"PRO_Chad"
"PRO_Congo"
"PRO_Croatia"
"PRO_Czech Republic"
"PRO_Ethiopia"
"PRO_Gambia"
"PRO_Georgia"
"PRO_Iran (Islamic Republic of)"
"PRO_Iraq"
"PRO_Ivory Coast"
"PRO_Malaysia"
"PRO_Niger"
"PRO_North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea)"
"PRO_Peru"
"PRO_Russian Federation"
"PRO_Sudan"
"PRO_Turkmenistan"
"PRO_Ukraine"
"PRO_Uzbekistan"
"Air"
"Tier3"
notes"The Su-25, which is no longer in serial production, made its first flight in 1979. This single-seat ground-attack aircraft is a very durable airplane - it is fairly heavily armored -- and easy to service - all service equipment can be stored in a container and transported by the airplane itself. It is armed with one twin barrel 30mm gun in the bottom of the fuselage with 250 rounds. There are 8 pylons under the wings that can carry about 4,000 kg of air-to-ground weapons, including 57mm to 330mm rockets. There are two small outboard pylons for AA-2D/ATOLL or AA-8/APHID AAMs."
dateOfIntroduction1981
countryOfOrigin"Russia (RUS)"
proliferation"Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bulgaria, CFE Treaty, Chad, Congo, Croatia, Czech Republic, Ethiopia, Gambia, Georgia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Ivory Coast, Malaysia, Niger, North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea), Peru, Russian Federation, Sudan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan"
selectedregions
"All Regions"
checkedregions
Empty array
checkedcountries
"Angola"
"Armenia"
"Azerbaijan"
"Belarus"
"Bulgaria"
"CFE Treaty"
"Chad"
"Congo"
"Croatia"
"Czech Republic"
"Ethiopia"
"Gambia"
"Georgia"
"Iran (Islamic Republic of)"
"Iraq"
"Ivory Coast"
"Malaysia"
"Niger"
"North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea)"
"Peru"
"Russian Federation"
"Sudan"
"Turkmenistan"
"Ukraine"
"Uzbekistan"
dis
name"SU25 FROGFOOT"
string"01.02.222.002.008.000.000"
images
"Su-25_Grach_(Frogfoot)_Russian_(A).jpg"
"Su-25_Grach_(Frogfoot)_Russian_(B).jpg"
"Su-25_Grach_(Frogfoot)_Russian_(C).jpg"
sections
name"System"
properties
name"Alternate Designation(s)"
value"Su-25 Grach; NATO: Frogfoot"
name"Primary Function / Type"
value"Close Air Support Attack Aircraft"
name"Manufacturer"
value"Sukhoi"
name"Crew"
value"1"
units"ea"
name"Number of Engines"
value"2"
units"ea"
name"Number of Hard Points"
value"11 hardpoints with a capacity of up to 4,400 kg (9,700 lb) of stores"
name"Dimensions"
properties
name"Length"
value"15.53 m"
name"Height"
value"4.80 m"
name"Wingspan"
value"14.36 m"
name"Wing Area"
value"33.70 m sq"
name"Weight, Empty"
value"9,500 kg"
name"Weight, Normal Takeoff"
value"14,600 kg"
name"Weight, Maximum Takeoff"
value"17,600 kg"
name"Weight, Maximum Overload"
value"19,200 kg"
name"Maximum Weapon Load"
value"4,400 kg"
name"Automotive"
properties
name"Engine Name"
value"2 x Ryzhov (Tumansky) R-95"
name"Engine Type"
value"Turbojet"
name"Engine Power"
value"9,039 lb (4,100 kg) static thrust each"
name"Fuel Capacity"
value"6,415 liters"
name"Speed, Maximum Low Level"
value"970 km/h"
name"Speed, Landing"
value"220 km/h"
name"Takeoff Roll"
value"930 m with max payload"
name"Landing Roll"
value"600 m"
name"Rate of Climb"
value"4,320 m/min"
name"Ceiling"
value"7,000 m"
name"Turn Radius"
value"570 m with 3,307-lb (1,500-kg) payload at 4,921 ft (1,500 m) at 248 knots (286 mph, 460 km/h)"
name"Maximum Range at Low Level"
value"405 nm (466 mi, 740 km) with 9,700-lb (4,400-kg) weapons load"
name"Maximum Range at Altitude"
value"675 nm (777 mi, 1,250 km) with same load as above"
name"Main Gun System"
sections
name"System"
properties
name"Name"
value"1 x Gryazev-Shipunov GSh-30-2"
name"Type"
value"Autocannon"
name"Caliber"
value"30 mm"
name"Quantity"
value"1"
units"ea"
name"Length"
value"2,044 mm"
name"Weight"
value"105 kg"
name"Barrels"
value"2"
units"ea"
name"Action"
value"Recoil operated"
name"Rate of Fire"
value"1,000-3,000 rpm"
name"Muzzle Velocity"
value"870 m/s"
name"Maximum Firing Range"
value"1,800m"
name"Ammunition"
properties
name"Type"
value"Rifle"
name"Caliber"
value"30 mm"
name"Shell"
value"30×165mm"
name"Basic Load"
value"250 rounds"
name"Main Missile Systems"
sections
name"Main Missile System #1"
properties
name"Name"
value"Kh-23 Grom; NATO: A S-7 Kerry"
name"Type"
value"Air-to-Air Missile"
name"Manufacturer"
value"Zvezda-Strela"
name"Length"
value"3.525 m"
name"Diameter"
value"27.5 cm"
name"Wingspan"
value"78.5 cm"
name"Weight"
value"287 kg"
name"Warhead Weight"
value"111 kg"
name"Engine"
value"Solid fuel rocket"
name"Operational Range"
value"2–10 km"
name"Maximum Speed"
value"2,160–2,700 km/h"
name"Guidance System"
value"Radio command guidance"
name"Main Missile System #2"
properties
name"Name"
value"Kh-25; NATO: AS-10 Karen"
name"Type"
value"Air-to-Ground Missile"
name"Manufacturer"
value"Zvezda-Strela"
name"Length"
value"370.5 cm"
name"Diameter"
value"27.5 cm"
name"Wingspan"
value"75.5 cm"
name"Warhead"
value"High explosive, shell-forming"
name"Warhead Weight"
value"89.6 kg"
name"Operational Range"
value"11 km"
name"Maximum Speed"
value"1,370–2,410 km/h"
name"Guidance System"
value"Laser guidance, passive radar, TV guidance, IIR, Satellite guidance, active radar homing depending on varian"
properties
name"Maximum Weapons Load"
value"4,400 kg"
name"Rocket Weapon Systems"
sections
name"Rocket Weapon System #1"
properties
name"Name"
value"S-8"
name"Type"
value"HEAT Rocket"
name"Manufacturer"
value"INA"
name"Length"
value"1.56 m"
name"Diameter"
value"INA"
name"Weight"
value"11.5 kg"
name"Warhead Weight"
value"3.6 kg (0.9 kg of Hecphol-5/A-IX-10 explosive)"
name"Effective Range"
value"1.3 to 4 km"
name"Note"
value"Basic variant. 350 mm versus RHA. Velocity 692 m/s. N-26A fuze. BIK-2D motor powder. During launch of this model may have black smoke."
name"Bomb Weapon Systems"
sections
name"Bomb #1"
properties
name"Name"
value"BETAB-500"
name"Type"
value"Concrete-Piercing Bomb"
name"Length"
value"2,200 mm"
name"Diameter"
value"350 mm"
name"Weight"
value"477 kg"
name"Explosive Weight"
value"98 kg"
name"Release Altitude"
value"30–5,000 m"
name"Release Speed"
value"600–1,200 km/h"
name"Fire Control / Avionics"
properties
name"Fire Control System Type"
value"INA"
name"Fire Control Radar"
value"INA"
name"Laser Desingator"
value"INA"
name"IFF"
value"Yes"
name"Protection"
properties
name"Stealth Properties"
value"No"
name"Heat Signature Reduction"
value"INA"
name"Add on Armor"
value"INA"
name"NBC Protection"
value"INA"
name"EW Counter Measures"
value"INA"
name"Chaffs/Flares"
value"INA"
variants
name"Su-25"
notes"The basic version of the aircraft was produced at Factory 31, in Tbilisi, in the Soviet Republic of Georgia. Between 1978 and 1989, 582 single-seat Su-25s were produced in Georgia, not including aircraft produced under the Su-25K export program. This variant of the aircraft represents the backbone of the Russian Air Force's Su-25 fleet, currently the largest in the world. The aircraft experienced a number of accidents in operational service caused by system failures attributed to the salvo firing of weapons. In the wake of these incidents, the use of its main armament, the 240 mm S-24 rocket, was prohibited. In its place, the FAB-500 500 kg (1,100 lb) general-purpose high-explosive bomb became the primary armament."
name"Su-25K"
notes"The basic Su-25 model was used as the basis for a commercial export variant, known as the Su-25K (Komercheskiy). This model was also built at Factory 31 in Tbilisi, Georgia. The aircraft differed from the Soviet Air Force version in certain minor details concerning internal equipment. A total of 180 Su-25K aircraft were built between 1984 and 1989."
name"Su-25UB"
notes"The Su-25UB trainer (Uchebno-Boyevoy) was drawn up in 1977. The first prototype, called "T-8UB-1", was rolled out in July 1985 and its maiden flight was carried out at the Ulan-Ude factory airfield on 12 August of that year. By the end of 1986, 25 Su-25UBs had been produced at Ulan-Ude before the twin-seater completed its State trials and was officially cleared for service with the Soviet Air Force. It was intended for training and evaluation flights of active-duty pilots, and for training pilot cadets at Soviet Air Force flying schools. The performance did not differ substantially from that of the single-seater. The navigation, attack, sighting devices, and weapons-control systems of the two-seater enabled it to be used for both routine training and weapons-training missions."
name"Su-25UBK"
notes"From 1986 to 1989, in parallel with the construction of the main Su-25UB combat training variant, the Ulan-Ude plant produced the so-called "commercial" Su-25UBK, intended for export to countries that bought the Su-25K, and with similar modifications to that aircraft."
name"Su-25UBM"
notes"The Su-25UBM is a twin-seat variant that can be used as an operational trainer, but also has attack capabilities, and can be used for reconnaissance, target designation, and airborne control. Its first flight was on 6 December 2008 and it was certified in December 2010. It will enter operational use with the Russian Air Force later. The variant has a Phazotron NIIR Kopyo radar and Bars-2 equipment on board. Su-25UBM's range is believed to be 1,300 km (810 mi) and it may have protection against infra-red guided missiles (IRGM), a minimal requirement on today's battlefields where IRGMs proliferate."
name"Su-25UTG"
notes"The Su-25UTG (Uchebno-Trenirovochnyy s Gakom) is a variant of the Su-25UB designed to train pilots in takeoff and landing on a land-based simulated carrier deck, with a sloping ski-jump section and arrester wires. The first one flew in September 1988, and approximately 10 were produced. About half remained in Russian service after 1991; they were used on Russia's sole aircraft carrier, Admiral Kuznetsov. This small number of aircraft was insufficient to meet the training needs of Russia's carrier air group, so a number of Su-25UBs were converted into Su-25UTGs. These aircraft are distinguished by the alternative designation Su-25UBP (Uchebno-Boyevoy Palubny)—the adjective palubnyy meaning "deck", indicating that these aircraft have a naval function. Approximately 10 of these aircraft are currently operational in the Russian Navy as part of the 279th Naval Aviation Regiment."
name"Su-25BM"
notes"The Su-25BM (Buksirovshchik Misheney) is a target-towing variant of the Su-25 whose development began in 1986. The prototype, designated T-8BM1, successfully flew for the first time on 22 March 1990, at Tbilisi. After completion of the test phase, the aircraft was put into production. The Su-25BM target-tower was designed to provide towed target facilities for training ground forces and naval personnel in ground-to-air or naval surface-to-air missile systems. It is powered by an R-195 engine and equipped with an RSDN-10 long-range navigation system, an analog of the Western LORAN system."
name"Su-25T"
notes"The Su-25T (Tankovy) is a dedicated antitank version, which has been combat-tested with notable success in Chechnya. The design of the aircraft is similar to the Su-25UB. The variant was converted to a one-seater, with the rear seat replaced by additional avionics. It has all-weather and night attack capability. In addition to the full arsenal of weapons of the standard Su-25, the Su-25T can employ the KAB-500Kr TV-guided bomb and the semi-active laser-guided Kh-25ML. Its enlarged nosecone houses the Shkval optical TV and aiming system with the Prichal laser rangefinder and target designator. It can also carry Vikhr laser-guided, tube-launched missiles, which is its main antitank armament. For night operations, the low-light TV Merkuriy pod system can be carried under the fuselage. Three Su-25Ts prototypes were built in 1983–86 and 8 production aircraft were built in 1990. With the introduction of a definitive Russian Air Force Su-25 upgrade program, in the form of Stroyevoy Modernizirovannyi, the Su-25T program was officially canceled in 2000."
name"Su-25TM (Su-39)"
notes"A second-generation Su-25T, the Su-25TM (also designated Su-39), has been developed with improved navigation and attack systems, and better survivability. While retaining the built-in Shkval of Su-25T, it may carry Kopyo (rus. "Spear") radar in the container under the fuselage, which is used for engaging air targets (with RVV-AE/R-77 missiles) as well as ships (with Kh-31 and Kh-35 anti-ship missiles). The Russian Air Force has received 8 aircraft as of 2008. Some of the improved avionics systems designed for T and TM variants have been included in the Su-25SM, an interim upgrade of the operational Russian Air Force Su-25, for improved survivability and combat capability. The Su-25TM, as an all-inclusive upgrade program has been replaced with the "affordable" Su-25SM program."
name"Su-25SM"
notes"The Su-25SM (Stroyevoy Modernizirovannyi) is an "affordable" upgrade program for the Su-25, conceived by the Russian Air Force in 2000. The program stems from the attempted Su-25T and Su-25TM upgrades, which were evaluated and labeled as over-sophisticated and expensive. The SM upgrade incorporates avionics enhancements and airframe refurbishment to extend the Frogfoot's service life by up to 500 flight hours or 5 years. The Su-25SM's all-new PRnK-25SM "Bars" navigation/attack suite is built around the BTsVM-90 digital computer system, originally planned for the Su-25TM upgrade program. Navigation and attack precision provided by the new suite is three times better than the baseline Su-25 and is reported to be within 15 m (49 ft) using satellite correction and 200 m (660 ft) without it."
name"Su-25KM"
notes"The Su-25KM (Kommercheskiy Modernizirovannyy), nicknamed "Scorpion", is a Su-25 upgrade program announced in early 2001 by the original manufacturer, Tbilisi Aircraft Manufacturing in Georgia, in partnership with Elbit Systems of Israel. The prototype aircraft made its maiden flight on 18 April 2001 at Tbilisi in full Georgian Air Force markings. The aircraft uses a standard Su-25 airframe, enhanced with advanced avionics including a glass cockpit, digital map generator, helmet-mounted display, computerized weapons system, complete mission pre-plan capability, and fully redundant backup modes. Performance enhancements include a highly accurate navigation system, pinpoint weapon delivery systems, all-weather and day/night performance, NATO compatibility, state-of-the-art safety, and survivability features, and advanced onboard debriefing capabilities complying with international requirements. It has the ability to use Mark 82 and Mark 83 laser-guided bombs and air-to-air missiles, the short-range Vympel R-73."
name"Su-28"
notes"The Sukhoi Su-28 (also designated Su-25UT – Uchebno-Trenirovochnyy) is an advanced basic jet trainer, built on the basis of the Su-25UB as a private initiative by the Sukhoi Design Bureau. The Su-28 is a light aircraft designed to replace the Czechoslovak Aero L-39 Albatros. Unlike the basic Su-25UB, it lacks a weapons-control system, built-in cannon, weapons hardpoints, and engine armor."
name"Su-25R (Razvedchik)"
notes"a tactical reconnaissance variant designed in 1978, but never built."
name"Su-25U3"
notes"also known as the "Russian Troika", was a three-seat basic trainer aircraft. The project was suspended in 1991 due to a lack of funding."
name"Su-25U (Uchebnyy)"
notes"a trainer variant of Su-25s produced in Georgia between 1996 and 1998. Three aircraft were built in total, all for the Georgian Air Force."
name"Su-25M1/Su-25UBM1"
notes"Su-25 and Su-25UB exemplars slightly modernized by Ukrainian Air Force, at least nine modernized (eight single-seat and one two-seat). Upgrades include a new navigation system, enhanced survivability, more accurate weapon delivery, and other minor changes"
name"Ge-31"
notes"is an ongoing Georgian program of Tbilisi Aircraft Manufacturing aiming at producing a renewed version of Su-25 without Russian components and parts."
type"WEG"
version1
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